The Major Do’s and Don’ts of Running a Marathon

It’s nearly here – you’re just weeks away from your marathon day, and it’s time to put the finishing touches to your training.

But there are still a few essential things you need to do if you’re going to ensure you’re in the best possible form.

Follow these tips from our friends at Running With Us to make sure you get the most from your marathon performance.

 

 

 

The Do’s:

 

Motivation and positivity: It can be common to find yourself getting bored on the longer runs in the final few weeks, especially with temperatures dipping. Do stay positive – it happens! Surround yourself with people in training that will help you along the way. Plan to meet up with other runners to help motivate you to get out the door, and get the miles in. If that’s not possible, log your miles on Strava and encourage friends to share comments and kudos when you complete your next milestone. Use your running to explore new routes and places every now and then to keep things varied.

 

Nutrition is key: Make sure to fuel yourself cleverly. You will be burning more than you realise. Getting your nutrition right during training will help set you up for the perfect race day and give you the best possible chance of achieving a PB. Nutritional products can contain varying quantities of carbohydrate, protein and caffeine, so it’s very important to trial your nutrition during your longer runs and find what works for you. Don’t leave it until race day to try a new gel or bar. A HIGH5 trial pack offers a wide selection of options for both training and recovery. This simple nutrition guide will help you to fuel yourself properly so that you get the best from your marathon experience and enjoy it more.

 

Taper: Allow yourself to rest in the final couple of weeks. You need to go into the race feeling fresh rather than over-trained and tired. It’s good to keep muscles active and moving, but don’t be tempted to try and log the last-minute miles.

 

Pacing: Make sure to stick to your pace. Come the big day, try to avoid getting caught up on those running around you at the start. Remember all the hard work you have put into it and run the race just like you have in training. Stay focused and keep to your plan. If you’re attempting to run to a pace maker but find the pace too high, be honest about how you’re feeling, and whether you can maintain it. If you need to tag back to maintain better form mid-race, you might help yourself in the later miles.

 

 

The Don’ts:

 

Gear:  Don’t wear anything on the day you haven’t done in training. This can cause chafing and might even give you a reason to stop. Try out potential race day kit ideas in training on your easy runs to see how you feel in them… never on the day.

 

Sleep: Don’t be tempted to stay up too late and stand on your feet for long periods in the week leading up to your event: recovery is vital.  Make sure in the final weeks leading up to the race you are getting early nights and allowing maximum recovery. You need to listen to your body and sleep when you feel tired. The day before the race you need to be lying down as much as you can. Let family and friends around you know that you need to do this. This is a key period in your preparation – you have one chance.

 

Hydration: Try to avoid drinking too much, or in excess, during the final few days. It is possible to over-hydrate yourself which can risk leaving you feeling more tired as your body attempts to manage the extra fluid. Little and often throughout the day, (around 3-4 litres daily) is plenty when training for a marathon, however make sure you’re spreading it out. If you need to become better at hydrating yourself, start practising good habits early in your training. Electrolyte drinks are the best way to hydrate without having to take on huge amounts of water. They are filled with key nutrients. Check out this advice on hydration for what to drink and why.

 

 

For advice on what to eat and drink for your marathon, click here to see the HIGH5 Marathon Nutrition Guide and How To Carbo Load.

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Racing legend Sean Kelly talks cycling

Seven time Paris-Nice victor, nine time winner of the monument classics, and now one of Eurosport’s most well-respected commentators, Sean Kelly arguably headed up a golden era for Irish cycling that saw him emerge as one of the most successful professional road cyclists of the 80’s.

As his HIGH5-fuelled cycling development team, An Post-Chain Reaction, prepare their bikes and bidons for the start of the 8-day Tour of Britain from 3-8 September, it’s a stark reminder of just how far today’s advances in nutrition, technology and training have come since the days when Kelly scooped his Grand Tour win at the 1988 Vuelta a España.

In this interview, the Irish cycling legend tells us what he’s been getting up to and shares his views on cycling’s latest advances in the pro peloton.

 

 

Apart from helping riders to launch their World Tour careers with An Post-Chain Reaction, what else has been keeping you busy?

“I spent three weeks in Mallorca, where I’ve been involved in biking holiday tours. Of course, for the month of April, I was commentating on the classics during the weekends and I’ve been busy over summer at the big tours.”

Do you still find time to get on the bike?

“I try to get on the bike as much possible, so when I’m in Mallorca, I get on the bike most days. But when I’m away on commendatory duties with Eurosport, on big tours such as the Giro and Tour de France, you don’t really have time. The days are long, and if you take a bike with you, maybe you’ll get to ride two or three times during the three weeks. Instead, I have to do a bit of jogging to try and keep myself in some sort of shape.”

Which season do you regard as your most successful and why?

“I think ’84 was my best. I can’t remember it very clearly – it was a long time ago but I won over 30 races, as well as some of the classics. It’s really when you retire, and look back at your palmarès, you appreciate the great performances you had in your career.”

Is there a race that’s stayed clear in your memory more than any other?

“I enjoyed Paris-Nice because I had huge success, winning 7 times. It’s a race I had a lot of luck in. Some people say you make your luck as well in races, but I don’t believe that. There were years where there were lots of crashes and I just seemed to be on the lucky side of the crash, a number of times.”

 

 

Is there anything you regret, or wish you’d done differently in your career?

“Lots! I think hindsight is a great thing because you can look back and I certainly did too much racing in the early part of the season. I was riding for a Spanish team and they wanted to do a lot of the Spanish programme. At the beginning of the season – Andalusia, Tour de Catalunya, Tour de Valencia, Pays Basque – were all on the calendar, and of course the Vuelta was also at the beginning of the year in the ’80s. I think the one I have regrets about most, is the Tour de France. I should have done better, maybe have gotten on the podium, but there were just too many races in the early part of the season.”

What was a typical hard days training when you were in your prime?

“The hard days were when you were not going well in the big tours. When you are not in your best shape in the big tours, you have to suffer from fatigue, maybe half wheel through the race and look ahead. Maybe there’s a week or ten days to go and that’s when you’re really stat suffering, because you feel physically drained and that grinds on you mentally. So I think the most difficult ones are certainly the big three week tours when you are not in good shape. If you’re in good shape then you can get through it, you do suffer but it’s a different sort of suffering because you enjoy it more. When you’re at the rear of the pack it’s very difficult to keep motivated and to keep going.”

Who was your best friend when racing and are you still in touch?

“I think my best friends would be the ones I raced with in my team. Fellow Irish men, Martin Early and Acacio da Silva. Others, who maybe were on opposing teams as well, Adri Van der Poel and Stephen Roche, of course who I raced against a lot but we’re still very good friends. You meet so many people at races like the Tour de France. We don’t have contact, we don’t call each other every two or three months, but we meet regularly during the bike season.”

What was a typical hard day for you, when you were in your prime?

“The hard days were when you weren’t going well in the big tours. When you’re not in your best shape you suffer from fatigue, so you have to maybe half wheel through the race and look ahead. Maybe there’s a week or ten days to go and that’s when you really start suffering, because you feel physically drained and that grinds on you mentally. If you’re in good shape, you still suffer, but you enjoy it more. When you’re at the rear of the pack it’s very difficult to keep motivated and to keep going.”

Athletes can sometimes be superstitious. Did you have any superstitions that you believed in?

“I wasn’t a superstitious guy. I didn’t really believe in that, but sometimes before the big events you think ‘My God, hopefully I’ll be safe tomorrow’. To get through a race without any problems – that’s a big part. Mechanical problems, getting caught up in crashes. In the big races for example; Tour of Flanders; Paris Roubaix, they are races where there are a lot of crashes so, sometimes you say a little mantra.”

 

 

What would be your ultimate training tip for younger riders?

“First of all, follow what your coach tells you. Most youngsters who are serious about cycling have a coach nowadays, from at least junior level. At times, I see a lot of riders try and do more despite what their coach is telling them. When you’re feeling good, you think a bit extra will lead to you getting a bit better but that’s when you make mistakes and can potentially over train. It’s like a race, when you’re having a really good day, that’s the time you can make a lot of mistakes and it’s the same in training.”

And would you have any advice for someone new to cycling?

“I suppose you need patience. If you’ve come from other sports then you have a basic fitness and that does help a lot, but if you’re somebody who hasn’t done a lot of sport, you have to give it time. Biking is something that you have to build up slowly. If you really charge into it, you can get fit very quickly, but you don’t hold that. Fatigue and all those things can be a problem so you have to build up over a number of years to get to a high level. It also depends on what you want to do, what sort of level of racing you’re at; if you’re racing as a fourth category or third category you don’t need to be doing a huge amount of training. So there are a lot of things you have to consider before you can give advice to a person beginning his or her cycling career.”

What’s your opinion on the technological advancements now in cycling compared to when you were racing?

“Well, there are huge advantages. First of all, the bike is the biggest one, they have improved so much over the years. Carbon fibre, the wheels, everything is rigid and also aerodynamic. I think the performances are much better because of that but the way the athletes prepare has also improved. I think they are much better looked after. As I said, everybody seems to have a coach and that is something which is important because they can follow a programme and they can build up over a number of years. At the beginning of the season, you can begin to build up your fitness level. All of this has improved the performances of riders, so I think those things have been big improvements in cycling but not only in cycling but in other sports as well. You look at rugby and other similar games, now you can monitor performance a lot better, such as how far the players have ran during a match. It’s all development and it’s improved the performances of the athletes enormously.”

Disc brakes? Yes or no?

“Well I think disc brakes are the thing for the future. We’ve been hearing a lot about the dangers when the riders crash and if you fall down on the disc you can get badly burned. Also, the disc is very open if you crash into it. There are still a lot of improvements to be made there but I think the most important thing is that everybody involved in racing should use disc brakes, rather than normal caliper brakes, due to the huge difference in braking performance between disc brakes and normal calipers.”

 

 

What are your thoughts on the nutrition athletes adopt in today’s peloton? 

“Back in my day, we didn’t have the nutrition which cyclists have now and it is one of the biggest improvements. The energy bars, the gels and all the recovery shakes have improved the performance of the riders. The recovery in cycling, as we know, is of huge importance because cycling is such an endurance sport and when you’re in a big tour with four or five on the bike hours every day in very warm conditions, having the right nutrition is a huge benefit to bike riders.”

What’s next for Sean Kelly?

“My commentary job with EuroSport. I’m enjoying it and it keeps me involved in cycling – that’s a great thing. To stay involved in the sport is good for mind and for body and I hope to continue.”

Are there any plans you can tell us for the team’s future?

“We have had a lot of plans for the team and going back on the past number of years; we have always been trying to move up to Continental Pro after many years at the Continental level. However, there’s no point in being at the bottom of the rankings because then you are only following the races and you’re not getting success. I would prefer to stay at a good continental level than to be at the bottom end of the continental pro ranks.”

 

 

 

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Callum Hawkins

What is it like to prepare for a World Championship Marathon?

With the IAAF Athletics World Championship taking place in August, we asked Great Britain middle-distance runner, Olympian and HIGH5 athlete, Callum Hawkins  about his recent training in preparation for the World Championships Marathon on Sunday 6th August.

March saw me finish off my winter racing season with a hard fought 2nd place in the New York Half Marathon. I was slightly disappointed to be beaten by only 4 seconds and just being on the wrong side of the hour mark. However, I’ve got to be happy with running so close to my personal best on a tough course and pushing Olympic silver-medallist Feyisa Lilesa.  Racing through the streets of Manhattan was a great experience, it’s a fantastic race to be part of and the race organisers treat you like one of the family. It’s most definitely on my list of races to do again.

After New York, I took 10 days off as it had been a long winter season, after which I headed to Boulder, Colorado for a 5 week altitude training camp where I was staying with marathon legend and ex world record holder Steve Jones.

Training at altitude is harder, so recovery becomes hugely important especially as I was starting back from a rest period and ramping up the miles quite quickly. So packing lots of HIGH5 products was a necessity.

However, I quickly got into the swing of things and got some quality miles and sessions in with Steve’s group.  The weather in Boulder was great until my Dad (Coach) turned up and the weather went from slightly overcast to a few inches of snow.

Thankfully, my Dad and Steve did manage to keep the track clear for us during the session but they were definitely struggling for fitness at the end. Maybe I should have given them some Protein Recovery?

The training camp has set me up for my marathon specific training-block as I gear up for the world championships in London.  This is the hardest training block I do but it also has one of my favourite training sessions which is 11 x 1 km with 1 km float recovery or 1 km in and outs as we like to call them.  We reverse the session and start with a recovery pace effort first so, we finish on a fast one.  Paces for the fast kilometres are about 8 seconds faster than marathon race pace (3 minutes) and the recovery kilometres are around 3-8 seconds slower than race pace (3:10-3:15 minutes).

During the session, I also practice my race hydration and use EnergySource every 5 km, simulating what will happen during a marathon. I also keep an EnergyGel on hand in case I need a bit more fuel.

With warm up and cool down the session is around 20 miles and takes about 1 hour 45 minutes to complete.  It’s one of the hardest sessions I do so, recovery and refuelling afterwards is vital.

My immediate refuelling after the session is Protein Recovery mixed with milk and a ProteinBar. Those particular products are really good after a hard session as sometimes I can find it hard to eat a big meal so soon after training. I follow that up later in the day with my favourite, Spaghetti Bolognese using my Grandpa Drew’s secret recipe. It has a great balance of protein and carbohydrates which are essential for refuelling after a big session, especially when it is over 20 miles.

There’s one week to go until the World Championships on 6th August in London and I can’t wait to go up against the world’s best marathons runners again at a home championships.

Follow Callum Hawkin on Twitter: https://twitter.com/callhawk

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The secret ingredient for your marathon training

How important is it to rest during high mileage weeks leading up to a race such as the London Marathon? The answer is, yes you’ve guessed it, VERY important! In fact, it could be argued that it is just as important as making sure you are getting 7+ hours sleep everyday to be able to get up and work/train/perform the next day.

Recovery is the key to performing. It is sometimes abused and often not taken seriously enough. No matter what level and ability you are, recovering needs to be just as important as training. Us runners can be a stubborn bunch. For me personally my one day a week rest day couldn’t come soon enough, however once it’s here I’m itching to get out the door and run. I know though how important it is that I rest. I feel recharged, happier and stronger when running again.

Recovery isn’t just resting from running though, it’s giving your brain a break from training and giving your body a chance to refuel and absorb the vital nutrients your muscles need to recover and prepare for another hard week of training. Be smart and refuel cleverly.

Taking on vital the ingredients at times that matter will make a huge impact to your training. Protein as we all know has a huge benefit to recovering. Protein shakes, bars and meals will repair your muscles after training and help rebuild damaged muscle tissue. HIGH5 uses the very highest quality of whey protein isolate for optimal recovery. Post exercise nutrition can improve the quality and the rate of recovery after exercise. This is vital for reaching and maintaining a high level of fitness. Less muscle damage and better recovery can result in stronger more resilient muscle, lower risk of injury and more rapid fitness gains from your training. HIGH5 offer a range products that will compliment your recovery. You might also want to add a twist to you recovery drink – you can find some great ideas here.

Protein Recovery Smoothie

HIGH5 Running Nutrition Guides have been designed to help you run faster and to finish a challenge, like a marathon, feeling strong and with a smile on your face. High5 work exceptionally hard to ensure that you can perform at your best. HIGH5 nutrition undergoes rigorous testing in both the lab and with athletes in the real world. It won’t let you down when it matters most. Here you can find guides to support you on your running journey.

Enjoy your rest days, embrace them as they will make us runners faster and fitter. Without rest days we would run ourselves into the ground through over-training and increasing our risk of picking up an injury. Look after yourself, fuel yourself with the correct nutrition that will help you to replenish the vitamins and minerals that we lose through training… and lastly inspire others! There is always someone working harder than you out there but there is also always someone wishing they could be doing just as much as you!

Be clever – train smart! Your team from RunningWithUs

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The importance of the ‘long run’ & how to progress

The coaching team from RunningWithUs take a look at the long run and how you can use it to your best advantage for your marathon training.

NYC_LOTR-3118 2 (1)The ‘long run’ can be the most daunting part of your running training plan. The length of a long run is relative to the person running it and the distance that they are training for, but generally speaking a long run is between one and three hours, running at a low intensity. The long run takes an increasing role through February if you’re training for a spring race. A great goal is to get in a consistent weekly long run of 1 hour 45 minutes to 2 hours at a relaxed and conversational effort by the middle to end of February.

Increasing the miles
Patience is key, even for the more experienced runners. Adding 10-15 minutes each week onto your long run is a sensible progression. Don’t be surprised if niggles and fatigue set in as you start jumping up by 30-40 minutes at a time.

What pace should I run my long runs?
In early February, aim to keep your long runs at a fully conversational, relaxed pace that’s 45-60 seconds a mile slower than your planned marathon pace. This will build your body’s ability to burn stored fats and ensure you are fresh enough to hit your quality sessions mid-week.NYC_LOTR-0949

Pre-marathon race prep
Using a half marathon race as a marathon paced long run can be a great way of building confidence around
your goal marathon pace. As extra preparation, try adding 20-30 minutes easy before and after the half marathon.

How to fuel your long runs
When your long run starts to extend beyond the 1 hour 30 minute mark, we recommend your really start to practice with different options for pre-run breakfasts and also fuelling during the run itself. Your long run is the best opportunity to practise your race day nutrition strategy. Gels are the most efficient and effective way of getting carbohydrates quickly into the system whilst running. To start with, take small sips of gel and look to take one every 30-60 minutes or so during the course of your long run.

IMG_3102What gels should I choose?
There are lots of brands out there offering similar sports nutrition. HIGH5 have always been our ‘go to’ brand for fuelling and recovery. It’s clean energy with no added nasties, like artificial sweeteners.
Take one EnergyGel Plus or IsoGel Plus sachet every 20-30 minutes. Wait until 30 minutes from the start of your race before taking your first sachet. The most convenient way of carrying gels is to use a Gel Belt but make sure you test it out in training. There are always a few runners that lose their gels within the first miles of a race because the gels are the wrong size for their belt.

To ensure you are fuelling and refuelling yourself clever, check out HIGH5 Marathon Nutrition Guide.

Be safe, work hard and enjoy your run!

RunningWithUs

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Be a stronger runner this year

‘New Year, New You’! We’ve heard it loads before but what does it actually mean for you as an individual runner? The new year provides both a chance to start afresh, tackle new challenges and set new goals, review and consolidate the good training you may have implemented in 2016.

W13240603_1088938937846415_1548091568490348331_nhen thinking about 2017, runners can be broadly split into two categories: those who get majorly motivated by the statement and begin to plan this ‘New Self’ versus those who cynically think ‘yeah yeah I’ve tried it all before’.

The main reason many runner’s new years resolutions fail is because the goals are often too extreme and the changes unrealistic. However by choosing the correct targets for YOU and planning exactly how you are going to achieve them. By the end of 2017 you could find yourself smugly looking back over 12 months of new years resolutions having come true.

Here are some suggestions from HIGH5 running coaches Running With Us for different categories of runners who are looking for some new year inspiration or guidance.

The raw recruit

Park Blue 5354 croppedRunning has massively grown in popularity over the last few years and as running coaches we see a big influx of new runners into the sport each January. If you are a complete beginner and your New Years resolution is to take up running from scratch then firstly you need to choose an achievable target. A 5k is a great starting distance. The end goal gives your running focus and the training is manageable and not too daunting. Check out www.parkrun.org which might be a great place to start, plan your campaign to get to 5km to last 6-8 weeks and work with a structured plan if you can.

Work out how many times you can realistically fit running or exercise into your week and use this as a basis when choosing a training schedule. The number of training sessions can always be increased as fitness and motivation progress as the weeks go on, but beginning with an unrealistic number of sessions per week can often lead to demotivation due to this being unachievable. Too many people want to go from zero to hero in the first week!

Consistency is key, so if two or three runs per week fits in with your life balance right now and is an obtainable target then stick to this. Regularity of training over a few weeks beats binge training one week and doing nothing the next. If you can link up with a local running club or group who will help to motivate and inspire you to keep progressing. If you are not sure where to start check out www.runtogether.co.uk – there you will find details of groups in your area.

The seasoned campaigner

Training PlanIf you are a more experienced runner you have a choice. Churn out the same routes, runs and races or are you going to finally break that plateau and achieve some new PBs? If so then some changes certainly need to be made…

Sit down with a calendar; consider your goals, injuries, lifestyle and your current fitness and target a race that will allow you the time to peak at your optimum physical condition. For a marathon or a half this might require 12 months, for a 10km you might try to peak twice in a year but give yourself the time to incorporate some of the advice below. This is your macrocycle.

Within this period you should aim to break your year down into smaller chunks that give you the opportunity to develop different elements of your fitness: your endurance, your strength, your speed, your race pace, your taper. These smaller chunks are your mesocycles which typically last 4-8 weeks. Try some periods and races that will take you out of your comfort zone. For example, if you tend to focus on marathons and ultras look to include a phase in the year focusing on short distances and working on your 5-10km time or maybe even get onto the track in the summer. In the winter the cross country season can provide a great way of challenging your body differently.

Analyse what went right and wrong within last years training. Stick to the positive elements but change the negative. This may mean choosing a new and challenging training schedule, finding a coach who can give you fresh advice and structure or beginning training with other runners by joining a group/club.

Warehouse GrayPink 9074

The Spring marathoner
If 2017 is beginning with a spring marathon target for you, then let’s get organised and ensure you are on the road to success.

  • Have you chosen a good trustworthy training schedule that will guide you through the next 12 to 14 weeks and is suited to your ability? We have some great training plans here.
  • Have you scheduled in your pre-marathon races? One or two half marathons along the way will provide short and mid term goals and will give you an indication of how your training is going.
  • Are you wearing the correct trainers that have been fitted properly and suit your running needs?
  • Have you found a good trustworthy physio to help you with sports massage, injury prevention and provide an MOT to check for strengths/weaknesses and advise on what to concentrate on in order to get to that start line in one piece?

Have a look at the points above and aim to have them all ticked in order to begin your marathon journey successfully. It is time to get organised and get motivated. You can’t cram for a marathon and it is a process of putting all of the correct ingredients together in order to achieve your 26.2 miles of success!

Make 2017 the year you take control of your running. For nutrition advice for running check out this section: https://highfive.co.uk/high5-faster-and-further/#running.

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Winter Training Blog – Part 2

Winter Turbo Sessions

When winter draws in and the weather gets less inspiring, spending time outside on the bike seems less appealing and sometimes, not possible owing to floods, ice or snow. Turbo training is a great way to keep your fitness ticking over.

The following sessions offer some variety to keep boredom at bay and make the sessions more appealing. You can achieve a lot in a short time. Try to make a turbo session a regular part of your winter fitness programme. However, always get a check up from your GP before undertaking strenuous turbo training sessions. The reason that turbo sessions are so effective is because they are hard!!

Just like the rides you do outside, you should think about fuelling and hydrating. Before you do a high intensive session you need to be in the right state of mind. For additional focus and extra kick you can take caffeine drink like HIGH5 ZERO X’treme or a caffeine gel like HIGH5 IsoGel Plus Citrus.

With no air resistance (except maybe a fan), you will be sweating a lot on the turbo. If you’re not, then you’re not doing it right! The below sessions are all around 1 hour long. Refuelling with carbohydrates is not essential so a zero calorie electrolyte drink like HIGH5 ZERO will keep you hydrated.

Don’t forget to take a HIGH5 Protein Recovery drink straight after your session. We like to prepare it before we go on the turbo and have it ready in the fridge for immediate refreshment and to kick start your recovery. High quality whey protein isolate contributes to muscle growth and maintenance.

We’ve prepared 4 sessions to get you sweating…

Session 1

This session is designed to raise your lactate threshold and help you perform near it.

Warm-up

5 minutes spinning while increasing gearing/resistance, followed by 5 minutes of 10 seconds sprint and 50 seconds recovery.

Main set: 3-6 x 5min with 3min recovery

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Shift to the big chain ring and work hard for 5 minutes. Aim for a heart rate 15-25 beats below your maximum or, if using power, your FTP. The trick is not to go out too hard at the start so that you can maintain the pace for the full 5 minutes.

At the end of 5 minutes, drop back to the small chain ring, drop the resistance and spin easy for 3 minutes.

Depending on your ability/fitness, repeat this work/recovery cycle for three to six reps.

Cool-down

10 minutes easy spinning.

Session 2

This session is designed for building hill strength, as well as mental toughness!

Warm-up

10 minutes easy spinning, including some 10-20 second seated sprints in the second 5 minutes.

Main set: 3 x 6min of ascending difficulty with 2min recovery

Select the big ring but with a moderate sprocket (for example, 22t) the resistance should be at about a third of your turbo’s maximum. Ride moderately hard. After 3 minutes, shift up two gears and try to maintain the same cadence for a further 2 minutes. Finally, shift up another two gears and ride hard for a minute out of the saddle.

Drop to the small chain ring, drop the resistance and recover with easy spinning for two minutes. Shift back to the big ring but this time perform the ‘3 minutes, 2 minutes, 1 minute sequence with two more clicks of resistance.

Recover for two minutes again and then work through the ‘3, 2,1, again cranking it up by two clicks/gears.

Cool-down

10 minutes easy spinning.

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Session 3

This session is designed to develop climbing strength and pacing.

Warm-up

10 minutes easy spinning.

Main set – Up & down the gear block in 1min intervals

Zero your trip computer and select a fairly heavy resistance on the turbo along with your bottom gear (for example, 39 x 25). Ride sustainably hard, remembering you’ve got a long drag ahead and it’s going to get harder before it gets easier. Every minute shift up one gear all the way through the block. By the time you’re at the 11t or 12t, you should barely be turning the cranks. Keep going until you’ve been up and down the entire block twice.

The workout should take 33, 37 or 41 minutes depending whether you have a 9, 10 or 11 speed groupset. How far did you cover? Try to beat it next time!

Cool-down

10 minutes easy spinning.

Session 4

This session is designed to do a bit of everything! Pedalling technique, leg speed, strength, power and sustained effort.

Warm-up

10 minutes easy spinning.

Main Set

10min spin-ups

With resistance and gear fairly low, stay seated and spin up to maximum cadence. Hold the cadence up to 30 seconds and recover at an easy spin for the rest of the minute.

10min mixed climb

Crank up the resistance to high and find a gear that allows you, when working fairly hard, to maintain a cadence of 80-90rpm. Climb seated for 1 minute and then, having clicked up a couple of gears, climb out of the saddle. Alternative between seated and out of saddle riding every minute.

10min big gear sprints

Recover spinning easily for 1 minute at the end of the climb, and then select a high resistance and a big gear. From a standing start, sprint out of the saddle to get on top of the gear and then sit down and maintain the sprint. It should be a 100% 30 second effort. Rest completely for 90 seconds between efforts.

10min time trial

At medium resistance and gearing that allows you to work hard, but sustainably, at 90-100rpm ride a consistent 10 minutes. Try to make your effort constant without any tailing off.

Cool-down

10 minutes easy spinning.

So there you have it, four super awesome turbo sessions to bring pain and suffering back into your training schedule.

Enjoy!

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winter running

How to survive the winter running

Keeping yourself motivated when the weather turns cold and dark is the hardest part about being a runner. Running can start to feel like a chore. A mental barrier appears with numerous excuses stopping you from lacing up and getting out the front door. If this is you, then you aren’t the only one! We all have these mental battles, however it’s how you deal with them that matters. Plan your day accordingly: plan what time you are going to run and stick to it! Write it down, meet a friend, tell your partner when you’re heading out. Being this disciplined will keep you training and motivated.

2Staying warm is key! Make sure you don’t have the “it’s too cold to run” excuse lined up. Base layers, thermal tights and a jacket will keep you warm and dry. Make sure you are seen when out running in the dark, so a head torch is a must as well as highly visible kit. Not only does it keep you safe but also saves you from unseen potholes and puddles of water that you’re likely to run through.

Having enough energy to run can be the difference between a ‘good run’ and a ‘bad run’. You don’t want to come home from work, having to then force yourself to get out of the door lacking energy, feeling hungry and tired. Snacking between main meals is crucial to maintaining blood sugar levels throughout the day. A HIGH5 Protein Hit (Peanut & Caramel, Cacao & Orange, Coconut, Lemon & Raspberry) mid-afternoon is a perfect pre-training snack. It provides a good balance of carbs to protein to ensure you have enough energy for your evening run. The flavours are delicious, removes the ‘hangry’ [hungry & angry!] feeling on your commute home and fills you up without feeling full.

Keeping yourself hydrated in the winter is just as important as it is in the summer. Dehydration can increase your risk of getting ill, catching colds and resulting in time off training. HIGH5 ZERO tablets are a great source of electrolytes. One tablet added to 500 or 750ml of water (try warm or boiling water in the winter!) reduces tiredness and fatigue allowing you to train better for longer.

Get a race in the diary! This will give you a purpose to your training during the winter. Have a countdown, choose one of our online training plans and set yourself a goal. Planning, preparation, keeping warm and energised are the main factors to surviving training throughout the winter. Running is hobby, make time for it and remember to enjoy it!

Tips to take awaywarmzero
  • Stay warm and dryn’t ofrlet people know about your running plans, they will help to motivate you
  • Keep your energy levels up
  • Stay hydrated

Don’t forget to enter our latest competition for your chance to win a pair of Saucony Guide 10’s and a HIGH5 nutrition pack. Click Here to enter.

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Improve your swim performance

For most athletes, the swim can often be the least trained and most disliked discpline of a triathlon. With this in mind we recently spoke to #HIGH5fuelled Matt Trautman to get his advice on how to improve the swim section of your next triathlon.

hever_2016-4As a triathlete, squeezing in three different disciplines whilst juggling work and family commitments means you have to be very smart in how you allocate your training time. While the swim may be the shortest discipline and most people’s least enjoyable part of a triathlon, it is critical that you have enough swim fitness so that the rest of your race isn’t ruined before it really begins. Ensuring you aren’t overly fatigued when you leave the water will make a massive difference in being able to ride and run to your full potential.

For age group triathletes, the water temperature needs to be above 24°C before it becomes a wetsuit illegal swim. It means there is a pretty high chance you are going to be donning your neoprene come race day, and im_2in the tropical climates with warm water temperatures the swim is more often than in the sea. The wonderful thing about a wetsuit or swimming in salt water is that you are more buoyant, meaning you don’t have to kick as much so you can preserve your legs for the all important bike and run sections.

So how do we enhance our swimming? Quite simply you need to spend as much time as possible practicing and swimming your race stroke. This may seem obvious, but you still see numerous age group triathletes who are only able to swim 2-3 times a week spending half of their session doing kick sets or working on drills trying to get a ‘feel’ for the water.

A strong leg kick is not a top priority in a wetsuit legal swim. It gives you minimal propulsion and also fatigues those valuable leg muscles before the bike/run has started. Swimming as fast as possible with as little use of the legs should be a priority as a triathlete, especially over the longer distances.  Besides there being a very small chance of getting a good ‘feel’ for water, triathlons are not raced in a pool. Open water swims will be choppy if not from wind and waves then definitely from the hundreds of other competitors around you. Any chance of feeling the water and swimming smooth goes straight out the window.

tri-swim-cropped

Building upper body strength and resilience to complete a long distance swim comfortably, takes time and consistency in the pool. In order to put in the necessary mileage in the pool without getting overly fatigued, there are numerous swim aids you can use. The most important for a triathlete being the pull buoy followed by hand paddles. A pull buoy helps you focus on your stoke without the added stress of trying to stay afloat. It also mimics the body position you’ll have when wearing a wetsuit or even in a salt water swim and minimizes the propulsion you get from your leg kick.castle_series_howard-87

If you are new to swimming or even if you are a very experienced triathlete, doing the majority of your swim workouts with a pull buoy in place is not a problem. If it makes your swimming more enjoyable and means you’re spending more time in the pool, then even better!

There are numerous beneficial swim workouts you can do. If you don’t have a coach, then check out some of the hundreds of sessions that can be found online. The main thing is finding consistency and a swim rhythm that is going to propel you to a comfortable and hopefully fast swim time.

Mixing up aerobic swim sets with anaerobic (sprints) and strength (paddles) work during the week, or even within a session, will be beneficial and stop you from plateauing.

Here is a simple aerobic swim set that will help develop your pace awareness.

Warm Up: im_1-cropped
  • 8 x 25m (3 easy / 1 fast, 3 easy / 1 fast)
  • 6 x 25m (2 easy / 1 fast, 2 easy / 1 fast)
  • 4 x 25m (1 easy / 1 fast)
  • 2 x 25m (both fast)

10 second rest between each 25m, Pull Buoy optional

Main Set:
  • 2 x 400m paddles/pullbuoy. 70% effort
  • 4 x 200m pullbuoy only. 80% effort
  • 8 x 100 pullbuoy or swim only. All out effort but maintainable for all 8 reps

20 seconds rest for each set

Cool Down:
  • 1 x 200 easy

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winter nutrition

Winter Training Blog – Part 1

Winter offers a great opportunity to spice up your training and to try new sessions. We asked our friends at Andy Cook Cycling how to keep yourself riding through those cold winter months.

  1. Try riding your usual routes the other way round for a change and to add variety.
  2. Devise some small road circuits for use in the winter months, around 6-8 miles long. This means you are never too far from home should the weather turn or you run out of energy. Time yourself and try to beat it on the following lap!
  3. Commuting to work on a bike is a great way to utilise your travelling time and will keep your fitness ticking over.
  4. Keep motivated by looking back on your season and evaluate what you have achieved. Then look ahead to next season. Identify your goals and plan accordingly. Think about the events you want to enter.
  5. Join a club or go out with a group of like-minded friends. You’re more likely to get out of bed if you’ve arranged a meeting time and point. Riding in a group with the inevitable banter and competitive edge will make the miles more enjoyable and the hours pass far quicker. Other benefits include the fact that you’ll always have someone with you should you run into trouble to give a helping hand with mechanical issues. Sprint up the hills and then regroup at the top. Joining a club is also a great way to learn from experienced cyclists. You will learn the etiquette and skills of group riding. This will help at your next events.
  6. If you like to use events to keep you focused and motivated, try some winter sportives, reliability trials or Audax events.

zero-in-the-snow

If you don’t get the chance to ride during daylight, it can be daunting to ride in the dark but there are still options to stay on the bike:

  1. Try some of your local industrial estates. They are usually well-lit and traffic-free in the evenings: great for an hour’s tempo ride or intervals. It’s also a good opportunity to perfect cornering/gearing technique. Sprinting out of corners on a short 1 km circuit is great interval training.
  2. Try the Velodrome (if you live near a velodrome – there are more and more popping up around the country), they often have winter track leagues or sessions on during the evenings. It’s a great way of completing a good session in the warm and dry.
  3. Outdoor velodromes or cycling circuits often put on training sessions during the winter months. A great way to get some riding in on traffic free roads!
  4. Hit the turbo. High intensity interval sessions are very effective for maintaining and improving your fitness without needing to spend hours on the bike.

There are a lot of tips and tricks to keep you riding throughout the winter. It is after all the best opportunity to improve on areas of weakness and test out that new bike you want for Christmas.

In part 2 of the winter training series of blogs we will delve into some great turbo sessions for those days that you just to want to stay indoors.

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